Data from the National Survey of Family Growth indicate that in 2002, 77% of Americans had sex by age 20, and of that percent, 75% had premarital sex.In comparison, of women who turned 15 between 19, approximately 91% had premarital sex by age 30.An international online sex survey compared responses of residents of 37 countries against World Economic Forum figures for gender equality in those countries, finding that countries with high gender equality had respondents report more casual sex, a greater number of sex partners, younger ages for first sex, and greater tolerance of premarital sex.

A majority of Americans have had premarital sex, according to a 2007 article in Public Health Reports.

This fact is true for current young adults and also young adults in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Premarital sex is sexual activity practiced by people before they are married.

Historically, premarital sex was considered a moral issue which was taboo in many cultures and considered a sin by a number of religions, but since about the 1960s, it has become more widely accepted, especially in Western countries.

The term was used instead of fornication, which had negative connotations, and was closely related to the concept and approval of virginity, which is sexual abstinence until marriage.

The meaning has since shifted to refer to any sexual relations a person has prior to marriage and removing the emphasis on the relationship of the people involved. It is not clear whether sex between individuals legally forbidden from marrying, or the sexual relations of one uninterested in marrying would be considered premarital.

In the earlier years of the study, men reported more pleasure and greater anxiety than women, while women reported more feelings of guilt than men.

Cohort studies carried out over 23 years found that in later years, women expressed greater pleasure and less guilt.

Of women who turned 15 between 19, 82% of them had had premarital sex by age 30.